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and engine throttle. toyota, alone, i believe uses the better sensor on the engine throttle control, but the less reliable sensor on the accelerator pedal. i guess my question is why does toyota use at least concluded by some, a less reliable than most other manufacturers use? is it a cost issue or what has pushed toyota into that judgment? who could answer that question? >> yup. [speaking japanese] >> we never use a sensor less reliable because of the cost. [speaking japanese] >> we put together a system under which the two sensors do not really give out the same values at the same time. but so doing we could examine the validity of the signal of systems. >> all right. i'd like to inquire with a written question a little bit more about that subject. let me again make this point if i can, i think what you are saying to the committee is you're doing a lot to try to establish reliability, once again, i don't think think any question that everybody in the room has read the ratings over many, many years. toyota has been a brand of reliability and dependability and quality and so on. but
what the problem is. to predict defects, to catch them before they become major crises like toyota acceleration and ford explorer. if we had a international accident sampling system at the full design level of 19,000 crash we could have predicted defeats. we would have found them earlier. we wouldn't have them build up over 10 years before we get a recall and manufacturers like toyota suffer in their reputation. let's build the system. cutting corners on safety is no bargain for anyone, the consumers, manufacturers, or government. thank you. >> thank you, mr. ditlow. i will ask the first question and then senator wicker from mississippi who said he'll be back in time is acting today as the ranking member. and he will ask the second question, we will go on from there. mr. saski, last week, mr. lentz, the president of toyota motor sales usa testified that he had no authority so recall toyota vehicles sold in the united states when those vehicles have safety problems. now i believe either mr. inaba or uchiyamada were going to probe that. is that an rack rate -- an accurate statement a
." recent toyota recalls have questioned the government's enforcement auto safety standards, along with dave, president and ceo of the alliance of automobile manufacturers which represents toyota and detroit news reporter dave who covered the recent congressional hearings discuss federal oversight of car safety standards. we welcome your calls and tweets. it's underway at 8 p.m. eastern live on c san. and here's of portion of one of those recent corrosional hearings, starting with the opening statement of the executive vice president of the toyota corporation. >> my name is yew hiv yam da. i am the chief engineer for our company. i was fortunate to be the chief engineer of the first generation prius. i helped plan and develop the first hybrid in the world and this hybrid led over auto makers to realize they importance of environmentally-friendly technology. toyota testified to congress last year to show as the priority has traditionally been the point. first, 5th, second quality, third volume. our goal in developing generated technology isn't only to comprise with standards and to strive for
questioned about toyota last month. david strickland poke. here's part of that. >> chairman rush, ranking member and members of the committee, thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today to discuss the department of transportation's vision for the future of a national highway traffic safety administration and its safe -- and its important safety programs. transportation safety is department highest priority. n.h.t.s.a.'s safety programs are an interval part of addressing that priority. even before i was sworn in as administrator on january 4, i knew n.h.t.s.a.'s program worked. and they work well. we just released numbers that show a continuing dramatic reduction in the overall numbers of highway deaths. the secondary this morning released a report that projects that traffic fatalities have declined for the 15th consecutive quarter and will be 33,963 in 2009, the lowest annual level since 1954. but we must do more. the loss of more than 33,000 people represents a serious public health problem to our nation. we will not rest until that number is zero. so how do we get there? h
around? >> he drove. usually it was a toyota van is the best way i can describe it. it was pretty beaten up and battered. driving in afghanistan is like bumper pool. is not like the united states. there are a lot of cars. i always felt we were about to have an accident because everybody starts shipping around to get through. >> how often were you personally afraid? >> often times i was afraid after the fact. there was a time we were out after curfew early on and we were so frantic to get back into cobble so we could get past the check points. i didn't have time to be afraid. when we finally got through the mess we had to get through, we had some close calls. >> who is on the front of this? >> that is a picture of an afghan man on a motorcycle on his way to the air base. whether he is actually going to the bathroom or not i don't know. a colleague of mine took the photo from the car. >> how large is the u.s. military presence all-around afghanistan? do you see it constantly? >> you see a lot of vehicles. you see some soldiers on the street but you see a constant stream of military vehicle
? >> drove. >> what kind of car? >> well, it varied. usually it was a toyota van is the best way i can describe it. pretty beaten up and battered. the driving in afghanistan is sort of like bumper pool. it is not at all like the united states. a lot of honking. by alice thought we were about to have an accident. everybody just converges and shifts around to try to get through. >> how often were you personally afraid? >> you know, oftentimes i was afraid after the fact. there was a time when we were out after curfew early on in 2001. we were just so frantic to get back. when you get past the checkpoint there was a time when i really did not have time to be afraid. when we finally get through all the mess we had to get to her i've fought back, we had some close calls just now. >> two is on the front of this? >> the picture of an afghan man on a motorcycle on his way to bagram air base. a colleague of mine took the photo from the car. >> how large is the u.s. military presence there? do you see it constantly? >> you do. what you would not see a lot of these vehicles. you will see some sol
and to follow up on monday's announcement, a $16 million fine on toyota. that is live online at c-span.org and on c-span radio. up next, washington institute forum on nuclear security and the middle east. it is an hour and a half. >> good afternoon and welcome to the washington institute for middle east policy. i am the baker fellow and director of the gulf and energy policy program here. it also falls to me today to share this session. it is one of those curious occasions when i am also a speaker so i hope i will get the balance right. if i have to disagree with any aspect of myself. with me today to address this important topic of too little too late nuclear security in the middle east, gregory schulte and george perkovich. gregory schulte is currently the senior visiting fellow at the national defense university center for the study of weapons of mass destruction. there is no way you can get that on one line. from 2005 to 2009 he served as u.s. permanent representative at the international atomic energy agency in vienna. george perkovich who i had the honor of listening to this
you were at there? >> we drove. >> what kind of car? >> it varies but usually it was a toyota van is the best way i can describe it. it was pretty beaten up and battered. the tribe in afghanistan is like number pool. there is a lot of honking and a lot of cars. i always thought we are about to have an accident at any moment because everybody converges and ships around to try to get through. >> how often were you personally afraid? >> oftentimes i was afraid after-the-fact. there was a time when we were out after curfew early on in 2001 and we were just so frantic to get back into kabul so we could get back but checkpoints. at the time i didn't have the time to be afraid that when we finally got through the mess we had to get through i thought back and i thought we had some close calls. >> who was on the front of this? what is the picture? >> that is actually a picture of an afghan man on a motorcycle on his way to the airbase. it is on the road that leads the bagram airbase. whether or not he is going to bagram or not i don't know. a colleague of mine took this photo from the car.
somebody in a black toyota truck is going to drive by and throw acid in their faces as they are young girls going to school. you know, that's the kind of stuff that gets me excited. >> clearly, we've gone through the situation in a country where i think there's a lot of discussion right now about our role in afghanistan. and that wasn't even true a couple years ago. it seems to me there was a lot of division in iraq whether we should be there or not. but there is a fair amount of unanimity that afghanistan was the right war, that just work on the place where we should've been bipartisanship on that issue. and yet in the lead up to president obama's decision in december of last year and in the months since it seen as boylan today. what do you attribute the change to? >> a lack of understanding of what the real problem is. it is not wars and politics by other means. what americans have to come to grips that is that war equals also political change and there are certain parts of our society that use violence and chaos to create that change, but that's not what this problem is about. step back
their eyes because somebody in a black toyota truck is going to drive by and through acid in their face because they are young girls going to school. that is the kind of stuff, that gets me hot. >> we've gone through this situation in the country where i think there's a lot of discussion right now about our role in afghanistan and that wasn't even through a couple of years ago. it seems to me there was a lot of division about iraq whether we should be there or not but that there was a fair amount of unanimity that afghanistan was the right war, the just war, the place we should have been by partisanship on that issue and yet in the lead up to president obama's decision in december of last year and in the months since we've seen this kind of debate. what do you attribute the change to? >> lack of understanding of what the problem is that it's not war, politics by other means, that americans have to come to grips with is that wars -- war equals also political change and there are certain parts of society that use violence and chaos to create change but that is not with this problem is abo
accelerators on toyotas. such is the scope of hope and change in president obama's universe. the editorial goes on to say, in his 2011 budget the president zeroed out nasa constellation project, the project of launch and landing vehicles that were to replace the aging space shuttle fleet to carry americans into space. this is not a cost-cutting move. the agency is budgeted to receive $19 billion next year. and mr. obama wants to throw an additional $6 billion at it over the next five years. the hitch is he wants to shift its mission toward climate research and airplane design. anxious to stay relevant, nasa agreed to research the cause of toyota's sudden acceleration problem. nasa administrator charles bolden said thursday that federal money is budgeted for fostering the growth of the space industry including the development of space taxis. but if the results of the president's stimulus are any indication, command economic policy is an inefficient generator of jobs. it goes on to say, as nasa's wings are clipped, our competitors soar. the u.s. space agency even had to sign a $340 million deal w
be easily addressed. this particular burden came to light recently in the context of the tragic toyota crashes. during hearings held by chairman rockefeller in the commerce committee, we learned that although toyotas were equipped with e.d.r.'s, until recently they were only able to be read by one computer in the entire united states. that's why in addition to requiring the recorders in all vehicles for sale in the united states, the vehicle safety improvements act will also require that recorders be easily read by a universal tool, regardless of make or model of the vehicle. in addition, nhtsa's rule also fails to address medium- and heavy-duty vehicles. my legislation would require nhtsa to issue a rule addressing those vehicles as well. while they comprise a small percentage of the vehicle miles traveled on an annual basis, medium- and heavy-duty vehicles are overrepresented in crashes result ing in fatalities. in these crashes, an event data recorder would be a useful tool during the crash investigation in dirge the cause of the crash. -- in determining the cause of the crash. my b
to be the toyota mechanic and i'm here to answer any questions you may have and i look forward to your questioning. >> well, thank you for your energy and your passion on this issue. i share your concern about what we can do to help and it's frustrating we can't move faster to provide the opportunities for all the people in this country. i also very much acknowledge the great results on recruitmentment that is a clear sign that the right climate has returned to the civil rights division. and we've heard and you've told us about the regular meetings between the career attorneys and the political appointments so that you have a seamless system taking the best advice from the career attorneys. we very much appreciate that and we applaud your effort in that regard. >> i also appreciate you started with fair lending because i think in these economic times fair lending is an area we really need to put a spotlight on i agree with senator sessions that we do not want to put a climate out there that causes institutions to do things that are irresponsible. that's not our intentions and i agree with senator
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13

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